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 Post subject: Re: Long Term Food Storage - Video's and Information
PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2008 4:16 pm 
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ALSO

During the 1980s the Oregon Institute of Science and Medicine developed food storage recommendations that were subsequently adopted and publicized by FEMA.
The food storage suggestions are as follows:

1. Store whole grain - not ground or otherwise processed - corn, wheat, and soybeans in a ratio by weight of 2:2:1. In other words, if one is storing 40 pound plastic, nitrogen-packed pails of grain, store 2 pails each of wheat and corn for each single pail of soybeans. Combined in these proportions, ground to flour, cooked (as in corn bread), and eaten, 2 to 3 pounds per day of this mixture will provide the nutrition required for a marine in combat - except for vitamin C and salt. An ordinary person surviving during an emergency would require perhaps half as much. Note: soybeans must be cooked before eating to avoid danger to health.

Nitrogen packing helps to assure that insects cannot infest the food. Containers should be long-lived and rodent resistant. There are several good commercial sources of food already appropriately packaged for storage - for example, Walton Feed in Idaho.

2. Store 1 kilogram of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) for each person-year of food. This is 3 grams per day. People under stress require extra vitamin C for optimum health. For prevention of death from scurvy, however, about 1% of this amount will suffice, so storage of vitamin C in these amounts might save the lives of an entire community.

Store CRYSTALLINE vitamin C - not pills. During storage, the pills may deteriorate. In a cool, dry bottle, crystalline vitamin C will last indefinitely. Vitamin C can also be obtained by simply sprouting some of the food grain before eating. In a serious emergency, however, sprouting may prove difficult. Store also, in a cool place, a supply of ordinary multivitamin pills.

3. Store lots of salt. This could be crucial to saving many lives. An inexpensive and convenient form is in bags or salt blocks obtained from a local farm feed store.

4. For infants, store dried milk available from food storage suppliers in cans. Infants can live on the grain ration, but they may refuse to eat less familiar food and will do better with milk.

5. Store several 20 litre (5 gallon) plastic buckets each containing 25 pounds of ordinary table sugar - sucrose; 1 pound baking soda; 5 x 11 ounce containers of Lite salt - KCl &NaCl; and a teaspoon for measuring. Dehydration from burns and diseases such as cholera can be treated with proper oral administration of these items. Instructions can be found in the March 1988, Volume 1, # 12, Fighting Chance newsletter. These buckets could save many lives during a serious prolonged emergency, where ordinary medical care is not available.

In ordinary times, soy bean, corn, and wheat flour can serve as a base for delicious and nutritious corn bread - when cooked with lots of baking soda, vegetable oil, and fruit for flavor.

It is best to store food now, while it is still available at a reasonable price.

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 Post subject: Re: Long Term Food Storage - Video's and Information
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 7:19 am 
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Thread stickied. We will get a board soon for these useful sticky threads and to keep them out of the way for general survival talk.

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 Post subject: Re: Long Term Food Storage - Video's and Information
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 8:42 pm 
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Excellent! Thanks for the info Tez.

I've been looking at this food storage thing as a monumental task but the breakdown in those videos makes it seem not so bad. A couple of guys could fill several 55Gal drums using these techniques in a day or less.

Speaking of which, I didn't see them mention anything about prepping the 55Gal drums. Is there anything special that you need to do in that regard? I'm not sure that 55Gal drums will be my storage medium of choice, but it would be nice to know. I'm thinking I should stick to the smaller, more portable, 5gal buckets (hmm... how many 5gal buckets full of rice for 1 person for 1 year?).

Too many questions...

SgtS

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 Post subject: Re: Long Term Food Storage - Video's and Information
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 2:32 am 
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I don't think 55 gallon drum would be my size of choice, they would weigh too much and would be too hard to shift easily or manouvre around.
It would be best to stick with smaller pails for food grade materials, with a liner of Mylar and an oxygen absorber or use dry Co2 to displace or get rid of oxygen, best for any grains etc to stop attack by insects etc. and make sure they do not absorb moisture and go off.

I have a Listing of dry masses for various materials to the post to help with various materials weights. I will post this as soon as i can get it into a format the posting will take ok,

I will also add a calculator that gives an idea of a grain variety for each person for a year, and you should not just have one food, but a bit of a variety for nutrition needs.

***********************************************


For other materials, see here http://www.asiinstr.com/technical/Material_Bulk_Density_Chart_A.htm

Tez

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 Post subject: Re: Long Term Food Storage - Video's and Information
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 4:30 am 
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Image
http://s2d2.turboimagehost.com/t/502200_Density_of_Foodstuffs_-_P1.jpg
Click below for Full Size Image
http://s2d2.turboimagehost.com/sp/988927ee6865f612883b377cf9b9c6e5/Density_of_Foodstuffs_-_P1.jpg

Image
http://s2d2.turboimagehost.com/t/502201_Density_of_Foodstuffs_-_P2.jpg
Click below for Full Size Image
http://s2d2.turboimagehost.com/sp/f872430db5e2a9dff2fcc0f09a83f2ec/Density_of_Foodstuffs_-_P2.jpg

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 Post subject: Re: Long Term Food Storage - Video's and Information
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 5:58 am 
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FOOD STORAGE CALCULATOR

Yearly amount for one adult.

Grain (includes wheat, white rice, oats, corn, barley, pasta, etc.): 180 Kg / 400 lbs.
Legumes (dried beans, split peas, lentils, nuts, etc.): 27 kg / 60 lbs.
Dairy Products (powdered milk, cheese powder, canned cheese, etc.): 13.6 kg / 30 lbs.
Sugars (white sugar, brown sugar, syrup, molasses, honey, etc.): 27 kg / 60 lbs.
Leavening Agents (Yeast, baking powder, powdered eggs, etc.): 2.7 kg / 6 lbs.
Salt (Table salt, sea salt, soy sauce, bouillon, etc.): 2.7 kg / 6 lbs.
Fats (Vegetable oils, shortening, canned butter, etc.): 13.5 kg / 30 lbs.
Water: 63 litres / 14 gallons*
________________________________________
*NOTE: The amount of water shown is a minimal 2-week supply. It is rarely practical to store more. We suggest that you store this amount and supplement it with a good water filter and/or water purification kit.


Yearly amount for each CHILD under 12

Grain (includes wheat, white rice, oats, corn, barley, pasta, etc.): 118 kg / 260 lbs.
Legumes (dried beans, split peas, lentils, nuts, etc.): 18 kg / 39 lbs.
Dairy Products (powdered milk, cheese powder, canned cheese, etc.): 8.6 kg / 19 lbs.
Sugars (white sugar, brown sugar, syrup, molasses, honey, etc.): 18 kg / 39 lbs.
Leavening Agents (Yeast, baking powder, powdered eggs, etc.): 1.8 kg / 4 lbs.
Salt (Table salt, sea salt, soy sauce, bouillon, etc.): 1.8 kg / 4 lbs.
Fats (Vegetable oils, shortening, canned butter, etc.): 9 kg / 20 lbs.
Water: 63 litres / 14 gallons*
________________________________________
*NOTE: The amount of water shown is a minimal 2-week supply. It is rarely practical to store more. We suggest that you store this amount and supplement it with a good water filter and/or water purification kit.

*******************************************

Downloads

Spreadsheet 1: A Nutritional Calculator. You enter up to 12 different foods and their quantities. The spreadsheet will return to you the amounts for the combined foods you've entered. This spreadsheet is great for determining the combined nutritional content of recipes. It is set up to print all this information on a single sheet of paper if you so desire.

http://waltonfeed.com/cgi-bin/c/count.cgi?nutritn.zip

Spreadsheet 2: A Year Supply Calculator. You enter the number of people and the months to calculate for with up to 62 different foods at the same time and their quantities. The spreadsheet will return the daily RDAs, DRVs and other nutrients of the combined foods you've entered. You can easily change the input of foods, watching the output for the desired results.

http://waltonfeed.com/cgi-bin/c/count.cgi?yearstor.zip

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 Post subject: Re: Food And Nutrition and preservation and MORE
PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2009 5:47 am 
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No one seems to understand that after a 2012 disaster there won't be any civilation to replinish your stores! Yes, you have survived it but now what? If you haven't prepared with animals and seeds to restart an agrarian system you are screwed!


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 Post subject: Re: Food And Nutrition and preservation and MORE
PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2009 9:19 am 
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Farmerjoe im coming to live with u i have seen your posts on what u have planed with your farm and i think my family and i would survive comfortably there so just to give you a heads up expect company :)


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 Post subject: Re: Food And Nutrition and preservation and MORE
PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2009 5:39 am 
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Thanks fenux1255!!


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 Post subject: Re: Food And Nutrition and preservation and MORE
PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 6:48 pm 
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farmerjoe wrote:
No one seems to understand that after a 2012 disaster there won't be any civilation to replinish your stores! Yes, you have survived it but now what? If you haven't prepared with animals and seeds to restart an agrarian system you are screwed!


Tez you rock!!!

Ya FarmerJoe that's exactly what I was thinking. You can have all the stores you want but assuming they survive through all the events, which may not even be the case (prepare for the worst) eventually survival skills are essential to survive. The best hunter gatherer society will be the one to thrive. Those that rely on their stores will fail. The survivalists code is conserve wherever you can. Especially in the beginning it may be easier to obtain food from natural means.

Practical information will be more valuable than anything you could store. Catch a fish eat for a day learn to fish eat for a lifetime. It is just a question of what will be left to fish for. Have to be dynamic.

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 Post subject: Re: Food And Nutrition and preservation and MORE
PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:01 am 
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Now Tez, I wouldn't through out chunky milk! Chunky milk is half way to cheese! This is as good as it gets take this and make yourself some great cheese! or butter milk!!!!


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 Post subject: Re: Food And Nutrition and preservation and MORE
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 2:25 am 
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Does anyone think it's odd that we now have the seed bank in Norway? If everyone says 2012 is not going to happen, why is our goverment preparing for it? It would be nice to know what else can be housed in this seed bank.....goverment officials maybe? Everyone has to have a place to hide. And they are prepared for what will happen...to many secerts being kept. Check it out.


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... -pictures/

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 Post subject: Re: Food And Nutrition and preservation and MORE
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:55 am 
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I've read and re-read because I'm almost SURE I saw it somewhere, but I can't find it; when it comes to powdered milk what is the better type - instant or non-instant, and why? Also, how is it stored so as to ensure it keeps properly?

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 Post subject: Re: Food And Nutrition and preservation and MORE
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 3:15 am 
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I copied and book marked the links this is a very informative thread thank you

listen to Joe you must know how to survive if the grid goes down it could be years before it gets back up.
If you don't have the time now there are some good books like back to basics it shows you how to do every thing, like they did 300 years ago it even has some not so old alternative energy information.
or just go live with the Quakers. :twisted: :evil:

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 Post subject: Re: Expiration Dates
PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2009 4:57 am 
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What about radio?

I know very good and cheap all-wave radio receiver Degen.

But what about transmitter?
Something easy to operate, cheap and reliable.


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